Marijuana, weight gain and other misfortunes

Dear Dr. Mo: I’m worried that smoking marijuana might make me gain weight – is it true that this could happen?

Dear reader: Consuming marijuana classically produces symptoms of increased appetite (so called the munchies) and in principle, it could lead to weight gain in otherwise healthy individuals. This, in addition to its anti-nausea effect (anti-emetic) is the reason marijuana is sometimes prescribed to cancer patients to alleviate some of their symptoms (from both the illness and its therapy).

Get high and fat

Get high and fat

It also often causes a dry mouth, which is usually noted by users and I should say that the munchies really should be the least of your concerns when smoking marijuana.
Let me explain.

I’ve heard people claim otherwise but the fact is that intoxication with marijuana does significantly impair motor function and consequently seriously interferes with driving ability – being high or being drunk makes almost no difference.
It can also cause a heart to race (tachycardia) and induce serious discomfort and even a panic attack.

Heavy marijuana use over long time is strongly linked to Amotivational syndrome, which is characterized by apathy and boredom – if this sounds too esoteric, let me put it into a real clinical scenario: Continue reading

Last Resort: Oral Contraceptives as Emergency Contraception

OCP 2Dear Dr. Mo: What if I needed an emergency contraception and didn’t have it (couldn’t get it) – would a regular pill do the trick?

Dear reader: Even though I don’t recommend this as a contraceptive practice of choice, the answer is Yes.

Any Oral Contraceptive Pill can, in principle, be used as an Emergency Postcoital Contraception (EPC) as long as it contains a certain amount of estrogen hormone; the required amount is 200 μg of ethinyl estradiol (usually 20 – 35 μg of ethinyl estradiol per tablet but it may vary – read the composition label) – take the number of tablets to amount to 200 μg, then repeat in 12 hours. Continue reading

Herbal infusions during pregnancy – are they safe?

Dear Dr. Mo: What is the deal with other teas – not relating to caffeine? I’ve heard pregnant women shouldn’t drink chamomile tea…? I thought ‘herbs’ were generally healthy and a desirable component.

Dear reader: During pregnancy, many women choose herbal infusions instead of caffeinated drinks. Most of these choices are perfectly fine.
I would always advise to stay away from herbs and supplements of any sort during the first trimester, while the fetus is particularly vulnerable; but even during this sensitive period, one or two cups of herbal teas now and then (even daily) are so moderate an amount that any harm is virtually impossible.

Herbal infusions are generally safe during pregnancy

I would generally stay away from herbal infusions, which contain some additional supplements (such as Ginseng) as these are of unknown action on the fetus and are not undergoing sanction and approval by regulatory bodies. Choose pure herbal teas with nothing added.

The talk about herbs that may concern you is that some may help induce a certain level of uterine contraction so I’d stay away from herbs such as black or blue cohosh. Also avoid herbal infusions with known pharmacological actions that are intense and aggressive on your body and generally unhealthy like Sena leaves.

Chamomile infusion is fine and safe to drink in moderation – stay within a few cups a day but not liters of it. Continue reading