5 Cholesterol lowering foods – Infographic

FullSizeRenderDear Dr. Mo: What are some of the foods that could help lower my cholesterol?

Dear reader: Eating a healthy diet in general can be challenging and tailoring it to a specific health need only adds to that challenge. Before embarking on any significant change in your diet, I suggest you first speak with your doctor who could give you useful pointers, link you with a specialist and follow up on your progress.

 

To get you started, I’ve written about such foods here

To answer your question, I’ve made this useful infographic to serve as a quick reference point to what’s out there Continue reading

Here’s Why You’re Really Gaining Weight

Dear Dr. Mo: Could obesity be contagious?

Dear reader: Obesity is of course not infectious per se but it’s well known to be ‘socially contagious’ and in that sense your question is spot on – eating habits of eating companions or groups exert significant influence on us; and we are mostly unaware of this fact.

Social contagion

Social contagion

One is more likely to be overweight if one has a lot of friends who are overweight and a very good way to gain weight is to have lunches or dinners with other people, especially if they are overweight.

On average, if you grab a meal with a friend, you will eat about 35% more than what you would eat if you were eating alone.

If you are eating in a group of 4, you will eat about 75% more and in groups of 7 or more people, you will probably eat 96% more! Continue reading

Zinc for the Common Cold – Does It Work?

Get your Zinc from food

Get your Zinc from food

Dear Dr. Mo: Is Zinc helpful in treating the common cold? Should I use it?

Dear reader: When we catch the infamous cold (acute upper respiratory tract infection), sometimes the symptoms may be severe enough that we reach out to anything that has even a hint of a promise of a quick cure.

 

The truth is, there’s no effective cure other than our own immune system and yet, many supplements are out on the market claiming to boost the immune response and help us fight off the virus.

Evidence is strong against any substantial effectiveness of any of these supplements.

Healthy diet and exercise remain the only sure fire ways to overcome the common cold – yes, even while you’re sick, if you can, you should moderately exercise (or at least stay active) and not rest for too long – this will speed up the recovery.

Zinc time and again emerges as one of the supplements suggested to help us fight the common cold but, does it work? Continue reading

The powerful vitamin A and what happens in vitamin deficiency

Dear Dr. Mo: You’ve mentioned that Squash is rich in vitamin A but cautioned not to take too much of it. How can vitamins hurt us? Specifically, why is vitamin A important and how can it be harmful? What’s happening in vitamins deficiency?

Squash and pumpkins are awesome sources of vitamin A

Squash and pumpkins are awesome sources of vitamin A

Dear reader: Vitamin A has many vital functions and people associate it with good vision and this is certainly true. This vitamin along with vitamins D,E and K is not water soluble, which means they are not easily removed from our body and can hang on for a long time in our fat tissue, being fat-soluble. That’s why too much of it will stick around and cause problems. Apart from good vision, here are a few other equally significant roles of vitamin A in normal, deficient and excess situation:

1. It is a cofactor for a hormone called PTH (Parathyroid hormone) and this means that without it the hormone cannot function properly. PTH is necessary for Calcium balance in our body – this means that PTH controls the levels of Calcium in our blood; it affects the strength and health of our bones, the absorption of Calcium from our gut etc. Except for bone health, Calcium is also very important in cellular functioning and without it (or with too much of it) many of our vital processes stop or become excessive (for example, muscle contractions including heart, secretion of hormones like for instance insulin etc..).
Contrary to deficiency, vitamin A excess will cause PTH to work too much and increase levels of Calcium at the expense of our bones; too much Calcium will cause problems with muscle contractions known as tetanic contractions, our heart will not beat properly, kidneys may develop stones, Calcium will leak out into urine and the entire system will be thrown off balance.

2. It’s necessary for production of the fluid that cushions and maintains our brain and spinal cord called Cerebro-Spinal Fluid (CSF) – in vitamin A deficiency the CSF production is low but the body doesn’t know it; on the flip side of it, if vitamin A is in excess, too much CSF will cause dangerous increase in pressure in the skull which manifests itself with strong headaches and optic nerve swelling and can lead if left untreated to blindness and/or even death via something called brain herniation.

3. It’s crucial in maturation of cells such as the ones in hair, skin and eyes or linings of our organs like the lungs or intestines. So if for example a child is recovering from Measles, a doctor may give some vitamin A to speed up the regeneration of the child’s worn away cells in the lungs. We also give vitamin A to transform one exceptionally lethal type of Leukemia called PML (Pro-Myeloblastic Leukemia) into one less lethal called AML to help patients live longer with the disease. Vitamin A is used in Dermatology to manage some diseases etc. Continue reading

Your lifestyle can protect your brain – small lifestyle changes largely reduce stroke risk

Image Credit: American Heart Association

Image Credit: American Heart Association

Dear Dr. Mo: Someone I know has just had a stroke. What can I do to reduce my risks of stroke? I’m middle aged and generally in good health.

Dear reader: What we have long suspected, the latest study published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke confirms: By making small changes in our lifestyle, we could reduce our risk of having a stroke by up to 48%, depending on our general health status – the better our overall health, the larger the reduction in stroke risk!

Researchers in the study assessed stroke risk by using the American Heart Association’s  Life’s Simple 7 health factors: 

  1. Be active
  2. Control cholesterol
  3. Eat a healthy diet
  4. Manage blood pressure
  5. Maintain a healthy weight
  6. Control blood sugar and
  7. Don’t smoke

Continue reading

4 super foods to clean up your pipes

Awful but healthy

Awful but healthy

Dear readers, our modern diets are plagued with unhealthful food choices. Many people are struggling with excess weight and our arteries are taking the toll over the years – they begin to accumulate plaque. Plaque buildup increases the chances for heart disease, heart attack and/or stroke.

This basically means accelerated death. Or debilitation. Then death.

We can use a healthy diet to keep our arteries in good shape and preserve their fitness into the old age.

The following 4 foods are very powerful arterial cleansers – I cannot say which of the first three I hate more but these are my top 3 foods I’ll never ever eat even if it kills me. The 4th food is actually pretty cool.

That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t eat them and in fact, you’ll benefit greatly if you introduced all 4 to your daily diet. Here’s why: Continue reading